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VBOX Mining FAQ

Software

What is TKPH and why is it useful for mining operations?

 

What is TKPH?

TKPH stands for Tonne-Kilometres Per Hour (or TMPH: Ton-Miles Per Hour), and is a rating for each tyre specification representing load carrying capacity in relation to heat generation. This rating is compared to site TKPH, which represents the operational TKPH of any given vehicle.

 

How is TKPH calculated for a vehicle?

TKPH calculation methods vary slightly between tyre manufacturers. The general concept is to represent TKPH as (Tyre Load) x (Average Speed).

 

For example, Michelin has a calculation method that applies corrections to the Site Operational TKPH of the vehicle whilst Bridgestone applies corrections to the Rate TKPH of the tyre. The details can be found in their respective data books.

 

Why is TKPH useful?

Tyre selection is one of the most important factors for tyre life. Choosing the correct tyre specification with the most appropriate TKPH rating for site operations can significantly improve tyre life and reduce vehicle operational costs, with each tyre costing up to $50,000 USD.

 

  • Higher TKPH = Higher Heat Resistance (better for long haul cycles) and Lower Wear Resistance (bad for worn out tyre life).
  • Lower TKPH = Lower Heat Resistance (bad for long haul cycles) and Higher Wear Resistance (good for worn out tyre life).

 

Why VBOX?

VBOX has been used on mine sites around the world for over 10 years due to proven performance in automotive applications. For TKPH studies, 'Tier One' Tyre Manufacturers and Tyre Management Consultants often use VBOX to evaluate site operations.

 

The TKPH plugin on VBOX Test Suite standardises the TKPH calculation to make it quick and easy to generate results and compare performance. Data can easily be viewed at varying levels of resolution, from a sample level to a cycle level or a moving average over the entire dataset.

 

VBOX software allows mining users to model site operational TKPH of the vehicle and compare this against the rated TKPH of a range of tyres that could be fitted to that vehicle or fleet. This is most useful for trialling new circuits, new tyre specifications or investigating particular cycles.

 

How do I analyse TKPH on a Water Truck?

A water truck is not expected to follow the same cyclic pattern as a haul truck. Therefore, the detection of load/dump events in the TKPH plugin is not necessary so user input is simplified.

 

The TKPH moving average will assume 50 % time loaded and 50 % time unloaded if no load/dump locations are designated by the user.

 

So, to summarise a possible method for water truck TKPH analysis:

 

Map

  • Remove all load/dump areas on the map

 

Session Data

  • Enter Payload as desired water capacity (in tonnes/tons)
  • Edit Empty Vehicle Weight while accounting for vehicle modifications
     

Report

  • Generate Report and focus on moving average results

How do I process the multiple .vbo files for TKPH analysis?

Once you retrieve the .vbo data files as logged by the VBOX, you can use VBOX File Processor to process the files to make them more manageable before analysis in VBOX Test Suite.

 

Firstly, use the Downsample plugin to change the sample rate of the files. For example, users often downsample from 10 Hz to 1 Hz for large datasets.

After downsampling, you can join all of the processed files together using VBO Append. This will create one file, which you can analyse with VBOX Test Suite.

How does VBTS identify load/dump events?

When the vehicle stops in a load/dump region as marked on the map, VBOX Test Suite will use conditions as below to determine load/dump events. These events can be checked by comparing vehicle movement to the vehicle weight when added to the Chart.

 

  • When speed is less than 0.8 km/h for at least one sample the vehicle is considered stationary
  • When speed remains less than Maximum Load/Dump Speed the vehicle is effectively considered as still stationary
  • When a stationary period becomes more than Minimum Load/Dump Time the load/dump event is considered as having taken place
  • When the vehicle leaves the load/dump area following these conditions, the load/dump event is considered complete as of the time speed exceeds 0.8 km/h prior to leaving the load/dump area

 

Under Test Configuration, there is an Advanced section, with default values as below:

  • Minimum Load Time: 20 seconds
  • Minimum Dump Time: 0.5 seconds
  • Maximum Load Speed: 5 km/h
  • Maximum Dump Speed: 0 km/h

 

These settings can be adjusted to ensure cycles are being identified correctly.

Hardware

What is the recommended system for equipment owners?

The VBOX Video HD2 is the most effective VBOX Mining Solution for equipment owners, as it is most suited to long-term indefinite fitment on a haul truck.

 

The VBOX Video HD2 is the only VBOX logger that is introducing a ring buffer, also known as cyclic or circular logging. This means that the VBOX Video HD2 will delete the oldest files as the memory card becomes full to make room for new files.

 

The ring buffer on the VBOX Video HD2 system will be useful when you leave a VBOX permanently fitted to a vehicle; only to retrieve the most recent data as needed. This will also be particularly useful for trialling new circuits or investigating incidents, breakdowns and equipment failures.

What is the recommended system for site visitors?

  1. The Rugged Video VBOX Pro has been designed for those travelling between mine sites whilst the robust case protects the equipment in a mining environment.

    The case is a modified 1550 Pelican case and the standard package weighs approximately 7 kg. The Video VBOX Pro will require reliable access to cigarette DC power to gather days of data, otherwise a battery pack can be used to power the system for several hours.
     
  2. The VBOX Micro is a light-weight solution that does not support video, but it is the quickest VBOX system to fit temporarily.

    You can fit the VBOX Micro independently of truck power supply as it can be powered for several days via battery pack if video is not required.

What are the main camera options?

 

The main video loggers used on mine sites are the following:

  • 2 camera VBOX Video HD2 High-Definition system
  • 2 or 4 camera Video VBOX Pro Standard-Definition system (rugged upgrade also available)

 

Often, cameras are placed in some locations as below:

  • Inside-cabin facing operator/dashboard
  • Top-of-cabin facing forward (as pictured)
  • Side-of-truck facing down (as pictured)
  • Front-of-truck facing inside suspension (as pictured)

 

Racelogic offers the following mounts that all include the standard ¼-20 UNC thread:

  • RLACS233            Camera Suction Mount
  • RLACS251            Magnet Substitute for RLACS233 Camera Mount
  • RLVBACS041       Windscreen Suction Mount
  • RLACS149            Roll Cage Camera Mount for Forward Facing Camera

 

The following parts are required to adapt each HD camera assembly to any mount listed above:

  • MECH0276          VBOX Video HD2 Camera Clamp Rubber Strap
  • MECH0275          VBOX Video HD2 Camera Clamp Body

 

Although the HD cameras cannot be extended, the SD cameras can be extended with Video VBOX Pro extension cables.

 

Video VBOX Pro without Rugged Pelican Case:

  • RLCAB109-2 Video VBOX Pro Camera Extension cable - 2 m
  • RLCAB109-5 Video VBOX Pro Camera Extension cable - 5 m
  • RLCAB109-10 Video VBOX Pro Camera Extension cable - 10 m
  • RLCAB109-15 Video VBOX Pro Camera Extension cable - 15 m
  • RLCAB109-27 Video VBOX Pro Camera Extension cable - 27 m

 

Video VBOX Pro with Rugged Pelican Case:

  • RLCAB135 4WL2K Plug – Plug Rugged Camera to Pelican Case cable - 4 m
  • RLCAB136-3 4WL2K Plug – Socket Rugged Camera Extension cable - 3 m
  • RLCAB136-6 4WL2K Plug – Socket Rugged Camera Extension cable - 6 m

 

What is the difference between the VBOX Video HD2 and the Video VBOX Pro?

 

Cyclic Logging

The VBOX Video HD2 is the only VBOX logger that is introducing a ring buffer, also known as cyclic or circular logging. This means that the VBOX Video HD2 will delete the oldest files as the memory card becomes full to make room for new files.

 

The ring buffer on the VBOX Video HD2 system will be useful when you leave a VBOX permanently fitted to a vehicle; only to retrieve the most recent data as needed. This will also be particularly useful for trialling new circuits or investigating incidents, breakdowns and equipment failures.

 

This is most useful for long-term fitments, however this feature will not be developed for any other VBOX video logger system. Therefore, for the Video VBOX Pro Standard-Definition system you will need to physically replace the card once it becomes full.

 

Camera Configuration

The VBOX Video HD2 High-Definition cameras consist of a single 3 m cable attached to each camera, and do not allow for extension cables due to the nature of the signal. The Video VBOX Pro Standard-Definition cameras allow for cable extensions so there is more flexibility to capture footage from several points-of-view and any cable damage could be easily replaced by replacing the extension cable whereas damage to the HD camera cables would require replacement of the entire camera assembly. There are also options for heavy duty camera cables and extension cables for the Rugged Video VBOX Standard-Definition system.

 

Physical Protection

A modified Pelican case has been designed around the Video VBOX Pro and its ability to use bulkhead connectors to connect heavy duty VBOX cabling to the outside of the Pelican case. Some users have applied a similar approach to the VBOX Video HD2, but since inline connectors cannot be used, a simple hole and rubber grommet has been applied to the lightweight VBOX case to protect the VBOX Video HD2 in a mining environment.

 

Features

VBOX Video HD2

Rugged Video VBOX

Video VBOX Pro

Cameras

Supports up to 2 HD cameras

Supports up to 4 heavy duty

SD cameras

Supports up to 4 SD cameras

Camera Cables

Does not support camera

extension cables

Supports heavy duty camera

extension cables

Supports camera extension cables

Logging

Supports cyclic (ring) buffer logging

Does not support cyclic logging

Does not support cyclic logging

Storage Media

Logs to SD card or USB drive

Logs to SD card or USB drive

Logs to SD card or USB drive

Antenna

GPS & GLONASS capable

GPS & GLONASS system

available

GPS & GLONASS system

available

Protection

Includes lightweight VBOX case

Includes heavy duty Pelican case

Includes lightweight VBOX case

How is the VBOX powered?

There are three main options for powering the VBOX unit whilst fitted on a haul truck:

  • 12 V DC truck power supply (cigar adaptor for in-cabin 12 V power; good for long-term fitment)
  • 24 V DC truck power (unterminated power cable; ideal for long-term fitment)
  • Battery pack (capable of capturing a few hours of footage or several days of VBOX Micro data independently of truck power supply)

 

Maximum DC Voltage Limits:

  • 15 V for Video VBOX Pro – voltage converter required for 24 V power supply
  • 30 V for VBOX Video HD2
  • 30 V for VBOX 2SX
  • 30 V for VBOX Micro

Where do I place the unit on the haul truck?

There are two main options for fitting the VBOX unit on a haul truck:

  1. Inside the cabin
    • VBOX unit secured and connected to in-cabin power supply
      • Antenna cable and camera cables fed through door seal or existing grommet
  2. Outside the cabin
    • Cabin roof mounting
      • Only the power cable will need to be fed through door seal or existing grommet if powered by in-cabin power supply
    • Front bumper mounting
      • Connected to truck battery with unterminated power cable and no cables passing inside the cabin

 

Note: Due to the range of fitment procedures on-site, the optional accessories to assist fitment include the lightweight VBOX case or the rugged Pelican case. It is advised that customers source/fabricate permanent mounting solutions independently.

How should I place my antenna to optimise satellite lock?

For the VBOX to acquire high quality satellite lock, the antenna should be exposed to as much sky as possible whilst fitted under conditions to minimise multipath interference.

 

For a haul truck, the antenna is best placed above the height of the tray/canopy. For example, mining users often use existing antenna mounts or fabricate poles on-site to raise the antenna higher than the truck tray/canopy during long-term fitment.

 

Ground Plane

On the end of the pole, it is advised to include a ground plane at the top on which to place the antenna – unless the antenna has an in-built ground plane. A well-placed ground plane will minimise multipath interference caused by reflections of weak GPS signals. Any structure above the ground plane can cause multipath interference. This is why an ideal ground plane would be above the canopy with nothing above it.

 

For example, a proven method involves placing the magnetic antenna on the top of a metal disc fixed to the end of the pole at the top – above the tray/canopy of the truck. Please click here to view the downloads section of the VBOX Mining website, which includes a drawing of this solution to assist with fabrication.

 

Note that this drawing includes minimum recommended dimensions, and it could be larger and thicker if it is easier for fabrication. The ground plane does not necessarily need to be steel. It is possible to fabricate a ground plane by using aluminium/silver/copper foil or metallic tape. Please click here to view further information on how antennas are applied in VBOX Automotive applications.

 

Antenna Cable

The antenna cable will need to be long enough to run from the VBOX unit up to the antenna, ideally placed at the top of the tray/canopy. Usually, a 10 m antenna cable provides users with enough length to place the antenna cable appropriately but there are also other options with varying thickness and length depending on which antenna is fitted. See What are my main antenna options? for more details.

 

Alternatively, some users have temporarily placed an antenna on the left-hand-side of the truck near the side-view mirror. This makes it easy to fit and test the unit, however this is not ideal antenna placement as it would effectively limit half of the sky – this is why it is much better to raise the antenna above the tray/canopy.

 

Note: Due to the range of fitment procedures on-site, it is advised that customers source permanent mounting solutions independently. Racelogic shall not provide haul truck extension poles due to the variation between vehicles on-site. Racelogic offer the Dual Antenna Mounting Pole, but this will be an expensive solution due to shipping, and is not guaranteed to apply to the mining environment as it is not designed for haul trucks.

What are my main antenna options?

There are two main types of antennas:

  1. Antennas that have an attached cable with an SMA plug to plug directly into the VBOX unit
        •   The attached cables can be extended before plugging into the VBOX unit
  2. Detachable antennas that have a SMA socket without an antenna cable
        •   The detachable antennas require a SMA plug – SMA plug antenna cable to plug into the VBOX unit.
     

There are varying cable types; the most common of which are RG174 and RG223 specifications. Please contact us if you require a custom cable to be made for your application, or if you would like to enquire about other cable lengths.

 

The main options are shown in the table below:

 

Antenna Type

RG174 cable (Ø 2.8 mm)*

RG223 cable (Ø 5.4 mm)**

Attached Antenna with SMA plug

e.g. RLVBACS018, RLACS220

10 m RG174 extension cable with SMA plug – SMA socket (RLCAB018)

*1 m option also available

20 m RG223 extension cable with SMA plug – SMA socket (RLCAB104-20)

*10 m, 12 m, 25 m options also available

Detachable Antenna with SMA socket

e.g. RLACS156, RLACS158

10 m RG174 cable with SMA plug – SMA plug (RLCAB071-10)

*1 m, 2 m, 4 m, 5 m options also available

20 m RG223 cable with SMA plug – SMA plug (RLCAB080-20)

*4 m 10 m, 13 m, 15 m options also available

* RG174 cables are not recommended to be over 10 m due to signal loss from cable thickness.

** RG223 cables are recommended for lengths over 10 m due to sufficient cable thickness.

 

Standard Antennas for common VBOX Mining systems:

  • RLVBACS018 (includes a 5 m attached RG174 cable)
    • Video VBOX Pro
    • VBOX Micro
    • VBOX 2SX
  • RLACS220 (includes a 3 m attached RG174 cable)
    • VBOX Video HD2
  • RLACS158 (includes a 4 m detachable RG174 cable RLCAB071-4)
    • Rugged Video VBOX Pro* see inventory for rugged antenna cable options
  • RLACS156 (includes a 4 m detachable RG174 cable RLCAB071-4)
    • Video VBOX Pro with GLONASS upgrade

 

More details on VBOX antennas can be found here.

Does the IMU log VBOX data?

The Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) is not a VBOX data logger.

 

It is a module that should be connected to a VBOX data logger to log accelerometer and gyroscope data to the VBOX as long as a CAN input is available.

Where should I place the IMU?

If the IMU is not used for IMU integration corrections, and it is simply being used to measure acceleration and rates of turn from the 3x acceleromoters and 3x gyroscopes, the IMU can effectively be placed anywhere on the vehicle, depending on the focus of the analysis and cable configuration.

 

Mining users often fit IMU systems to the suspension of the vehicle to estimate G-forces experienced by the tyres.

 

The IMU has been designed with 6x holes (Ø4.2 mm, No. 8 Thread Size) so it can be fitted with custom mounts, as long as it is mounted flat with the X-acceleration arrow in the forward direction.

 

 

Racelogic offer an IMU roof mount (RLACS216), which assists with mounting an IMU on a flat metallic surface, such as a roof.

What cables will I need for the IMU?

Depending on your VBOX system, there are a few cable options to either connect the IMU to the VBOX, daisy-chain multiple IMU systems together or plugging the unused port with a termination resistor.

 

Individual IMU to VBOX

 

VBOX Micro (5WF) to IMU04 (5WL or 6WL)

Cable length options:

  • RLCAB065-CS     VBOX Micro (5WF) – IMU04 (5WL) - 2 m cable
  • RLCAB065CS-5   VBOX Micro (5WF) – IMU04 (5WL) - 5 m cable
  • RLCAB065CS-1   VBOX Micro (5WF) – IMU04 (5WL) - 10 m cable

 

IMU04 unused socket (6WL):

  • RLACS165-S6W  CAN termination resistor Splashproof (6WSL) for IMU04

 

Video VBOX Pro / VBOX Video HD2 / VBOX 2SX (5WL) to IMU04 (5WL or 6WL)

Cable length options:

  • RLCAB120            Lemo 6W Plug Splashproof – Lemo 5W Plug - 2 m cable
  • RLCAB120-5        Lemo 6W Plug Splashproof – Lemo 5W Plug - 5 m cable
  • RLCAB120-10      Lemo 6W Plug Splashproof – Lemo 5W Plug - 10 m cable

 

IMU04 unused socket (5WL)

  • RLACS165-S        CAN termination resistor Splashproof (5WSL) for IMU04

 

Daisy-chained IMU's to VBOX

 

IMU04 (5WL or 6WL) to IMU04 (5WL or 6WL)

Cable length options:

  • RLCAB120S-05   Lemo 6W Plug Splashproof – Lemo 5W Plug Splashproof - 0.5 m cable
  • RLCAB120S-20   Lemo 6W Plug Splashproof – Lemo 5W Plug Splashproof - 20 m cable
     

IMU04 unused socket (5WL or 6WL)

  • RLACS165-S        CAN termination resistor Splashproof (5WSL) for IMU04
  • RLACS165-S6W  CAN termination resistor Splashproof (6WSL) for IMU04

 

Note: The VBOX 2SX/VBOX Micro cannot receive IMU data at the same time the CAN Bus is being used, for example, when the VBOX is receiving onboard vehicle data or TPMS data via CAN Bus.

Does Racelogic make TPMS products for VBOX?

Racelogic will not build Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) products, but it is possible to send CAN bus data to VBOX loggers, which allows users to trend parameters from other modules or the vehicle itself against absolute vehicle movements from VBOX GPS data.

 

For example, tyre temperature/pressure data could be trended against vehicle speed/acceleration to determine relationships between driving style and its effect on the tyres.

 

To configure the CAN bus, please contact us with CAN protocol information of the device from which you would like to pass data through to the VBOX. A CAN Protocol specification document and .dbc file will help identify your parameters of interest.

 

Racelogic’s VBOX CAN Database provides CAN protocol information in the form of .dbc files to pass VBOX data to other systems.

 

Racelogic’s Vehicle CAN Database provides a set of files that can be downloaded to your VBOX to configure it to receive information from a range of vehicle makes.

How do I log vehicle data from the CAN bus to the VBOX?

VBOX users can log vehicle data via CAN bus if CAN protocol information is provided i.e. CAN Protocol specification or .dbc file. This will allow the VBOX to be configured so the relevant CAN ID’s are identified and parameters of interest are logged directly from the vehicle (or any other CAN module, such as TPMS) to the VBOX.

 

Racelogic also provide unterminated cables to which users can adapt a connector on the end of the cable to adapt it to the vehicle CAN port. Alternatively, contact us for custom cable requirements.

 

To configure the CAN bus, please contact Racelogic with CAN protocol information of the device from which you would like to pass data through to the VBOX.

 

Racelogic’s VBOX CAN Database provides CAN protocol information in the form of .dbc files to pass VBOX data to other systems.

 

Racelogic’s Vehicle CAN Database provides a set of files that can be downloaded to your VBOX to configure it to receive information from a range of vehicle makes. For example, J1939 is available under Commercial Vehicles.

What underground solutions can VBOX offer?

GPS speed data is not available underground, however, VBOX can integrate with other systems to create other parameter channels (i.e. speed and distance) to be analysed using VBOX software.

 

RACELOGIC have conducted testing using a Radar III from DICKEY-john, and have confirmed that it is possible to log speed data from the radar to a VBOX 3i with the addition of a Mini Input Module. This would also be possible with the VBOX 2SX. However, it is not currently possible to determine the map route –  which is based on GPS coordinates – only speed and distance can be determined when the radar system is correctly configured to log to the VBOX. It would also be possible to log accelerometer/gyroscope data from an IMU system when connected.

 

When using a DICKEY-john radar to connect to the VBOX for underground applications, please note that DICKEY-john have advised that the above RVS Radar III Sensor would not be suitable if you are mining highly flammable materials or gas. Therefore, this system configuration is not recommended for environments with the potential of flammable gas such as underground coal mining.

 

Below is an excerpt from a test run on the road where GPS signal was lost due to the vehicle travelling under trees and tunnels. Red is GPS speed and grey is radar speed.

 

 

The input channel CANVEL will allow the VBOX to translate the radar data directly through to the GPS speed channel when GPS speed is not available.

How can VBOX be used for Brake Testing?

The VBOX brake testing product line has been designed to meet automotive regulations. Therefore, the high standard and expected quality of results is often beyond what is required by mining users.

 

Braking Distance Accuracy

To measure stopping distances from a trigger, a VBOX 2SX (5, 10 or 20 Hz) system allows users to determine the exact moment the brake trigger is pressed and the distance travelled before coming to a complete stop.

  • VBOX 2SX 5 Hz +/- 20 cm
  • VBOX 2SX 10 Hz +/- 15 cm
  • VBOX 2SX 20 Hz +/- 10 cm

 

VB2SX Brake Stop Accuracy refers to stopping distance as tested on a standard passenger vehicle, and may vary on a haul truck depending on the fitment and movement of the GPS antenna.

 

Calibration

VBOX systems can also be sent for calibration as required, although this is not necessary to ensure accuracy of VBOX equipment as calibration results are consistently positive.

 

Typical Brake Test Equipment

  • VBOX 2SX 5 Hz or 10 Hz or 20 Hz system
  • Brake Trigger (RLVBACS004) or Pedal Force Load Cell (enquire for custom solution if pedal force is required to be measured)
  • VBOX Display System (RLACS246) is delivered as a Surface Pro System configured for use with VBOX to run the VBOX Test Suite Brake Test plugin live
  • Microsoft Surface Accessories Kit (RLACS248)

 

There is also a Multi-Function Display (MFD), which displays live parameters. For example, the MFD is used so the driver can see live speed and trigger speed whilst conducting the brake test.

 

What are my options for protecting VBOX equipment?

Every standard VBOX system will include a lightweight VBOX case. For example, the VBOX Video HD2 system includes the VBOX HD2 Protective Carry Case (RLACS232) as standard.

 

Video systems for VBOX Mining users ship with a Large Lightweight VBOX Carry Case (RLACS109), which is similar to the lightweight VBOX case, but the top lid is larger and includes a plastic divider to facilitate storage, like a cable bin.

 

A Rugged Pelican case (RLACS245) is also available, as designed for the Video VBOX Pro to withstand the mining environment whether fitted in-cabin or outside-cabin. This case is also particularly useful for site visitors to store all components in one heavy duty case.

 

Upgraded heavy duty versions of the Video VBOX Pro Standard-Definition cameras (RLACS244) are available. The camera is protected with a stainless-steel enclosure, which features a Sapphire glass lens cover.

 

It is recommended for VBOX Mining users to externally source cable protection solutions to suit specific requirements on-site. For example, split plastic cable looms have been proven useful on-site to protect cables, control tension points, and minimize any trip hazards by increasing the visibility of cable components.

How accurate is VBOX?

High end VBOX systems used for automotive testing (i.e. Advanced Driver Assistance Systems) can provide up to 2 cm positional accuracy. This level of accuracy is usually not required for mining users – where common VBOX products used on-site are shown below.

 

Product Velocity Distance Absolute Positioning* Height* Heading Acceleration
VBOX Video HD2 10 Hz 0.1 km/h 0.05 % ±3 m ±10 m 0.3° 1 %
Video VBOX Pro 10 Hz 0.1 km/h 0.05 % ±3 m ±10 m 0.1° 1 %
Video VBOX Pro 20 Hz 0.1 km/h 0.05 % ±2.5 m ±6 m 0.1° 0.5 %
VBOX Micro 10 Hz 0.1 km/h 0.05 % ±3 m ±10 m 0.1° 1 %
VBOX 2SX 5 Hz 0.1 km/h 0.05 % (±20 cm brake stop**) ±3 m*** ±6 m**** 0.1° 0.5 %
VBOX 2SX 10 Hz 0.1 km/h 0.05 % (±15 cm brake stop**) ±3 m*** ±6 m**** 0.1° 0.5 %
VBOX 2SX 20 Hz 0.1 km/h 0.05 % (±10 cm brake stop**) ±3 m*** ±6 m**** 0.1° 0.5 %
VBOX 3i SLR 100 Hz RTK DGPS 0.1 km/h 0.05 % (±2 cm brake stop**) ±2 m ±2 cm 0.1° 0.5 %

* Absolute Positioning and Height accuracy is measured as 95 % Circle of Error Probable (CEP). This means 95 % of the time the position readings will fall within a circle of the stated radius.

** VB2SX Brake Stop Accuracy refers to stopping distance as tested on a standard passenger vehicle, and may vary on a haul truck depending on the fitment and movement of the GPS antenna.

*** VB2SX Absolute Positioning Accuracy:

  • With SBAS DGPS: <1 m in Europe, <1.8 m in USA and Asia
  • With RTCM DGPS: 40 cm
  • With local upgrade: 20 cm

**** VB2SX Height Accuracy:

  • With SBAS DGPS: ±2 m
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Last modified
12:08, 17 May 2017

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